It’s the 6th May, and as I type this the male and female parents to be used for the second round of spawning at Purdin Koi Farm have been together in the spawning nets for around 10 hours or so.

Spawning nets set up

Spawning nets set up

I have received many questions regarding the spawning nets and media, in particular where to get them from.  Both of these items are imported from Japan where they are specifically made for the spawning of Nishikigoi and used by breeders the length and breadth of the country.  I’m not aware of anywhere outside of Japan where these products are readily available, and whilst there are many ‘spawning brushes’ available they are invariably much stiffer than the Japanese ones.  Should anyone want to purchase these items then it is quite possible that the Miyakoya dry goods outlet in Ojiya, Niigata may well be able to assist, however their website (and staff who run the company) only speak Japanese I think.  This link to their website show the relevant products – http://www.echigo.ne.jp/~miyakoya/szi04014.htm.

Back to the parents in question for the 2nd round of spawning.

First up is a Kohaku known as ‘Momotaro’, after the farm from which her mother came, the famous Okayama Momotaro Koi Farm.  The 4 step Kohaku was bred at Purdin Koi Farm in 2014.

I encountered this Koi on my first visit to Purdin in November 2015 when she was nisai (pictured below).  I don’t have a record of her size then, however a year later as sansai she was 77cm (around 12cm larger than her siblings that had spent the summer with her in ‘the river’, see them here – http://nishikigoi.life/2016/12/12/2016-harvest-highlights-purdin-koi-farm/).

'Momotaro' as a nisai in November 2015

‘Momotaro’ as a nisai in November 2015

She was spawned for the first time last year – http://nishikigoi.life/2017/05/04/purdin-diaries-april-30th-may-3rd/ – and gave a massive crop of eggs and a number of her offspring remain here in the grow out ponds.  Be sure to keep an eye out for a post detailing all of the tosai tategoi that have come from this Koi in the near future.


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I’m not sure of her exact size now, but as a yonsai she must be around 85cm.  What is obvious compared to earlier years is how much her beni has started to consolidate in thickness, when young it simply couldn’t keep up with her growth.

For 2018 she has been ‘paired’ with the same 2 males as last year, along with another young ‘stud’.  Two of the male Kohaku were bred at Purdin Koi Farm, the other is an fish imported bred by Sakai Hiroshima (lower left in the picture below).

Kohaku Parent Set

Kohaku Parent Set

The next set is a Goshiki/Ginrin Goshiki set.  As has been the case the last couple of years normal and ginrin males have been used together with the female.

At first, and indeed second, glance the female doesn’t really look like Goshiki, however she was the product of Goshiki spawning here at Purdin Koi Farm.

Goshiki Parent Set

Goshiki Parent Set

This was again a fish I first encountered in November 2015 when we netted her from ‘the river’ where she had spent the summer, I’m guessing she was a sansai at that point in time.  She was used as a parent in 2016 – http://nishikigoi.life/2016/05/11/purdin-koi-farm-spawning-underway/ – and several of her offspring remain on the farm as potential oyagoi of the future.

Scott Purdin looking at the Goshiki female in November 2015

Scott Purdin looking at the Goshiki female in November 2015

Goshiki female photographed November 2015

Goshiki female photographed November 2015

The 3 males that she is ‘paired’ with on this occasion are from 3 different sources.  The ginrin male is from Koda Koi Farm.  This male was used with her back in 2016 and always produces some amazing quality ginrin children whichever female he goes with.  Koda ginrin really is first class, indeed I even purchased a couple of Ginrin Showa 2 years ago – http://nishikigoi.life/?s=koda.


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The Maruten Goshiki originates from Kanno Koi Farm.  It’s over 10 years ago that I first met Kazuhiro Hirasawa and his father in Yamakoshi as they harvested some nisai Goshiki.  On that day I remarked that the little known ‘Kanno’ was perhaps the number 1 Goshiki breeder in Niigata.  That’s certainly now backed up by the records books.  The particular male in question has never been used since it was imported, apparently it’s condition was never conducive to use as a parent.  When we pulled him up a couple of weeks ago everyone was amazed at how much he’d blossomed.

The 3rd and final Goshiki male is one that was bred here at Purdin Koi Farm, another fish I first encountered on my visit back in November 2015 when it was just a 6 month old tosai.  The left hand picture was taken November 2015, the right March 2016.  In March 2016 I wrote – ‘The Goshiki above is different to pretty much every other Goshiki tosai on the farm, particularly the shade of the grey background and the black scale edging.’

Purdin Koi Farm Tosai Goshiki

Purdin Koi Farm Tosai Goshiki

I don’t have a recent ‘glamour’ shot of him, but here are a couple of close ups from the spawning net (excuse ripples on water).

Purdin bred male Goshiki

Purdin bred male Goshiki

Purdin bred male Goshiki

Purdin bred male Goshiki

Arguably the 3rd set of parents, the Sanke set, are the most significant for Purdin Koi Farm.  All of the parents in this set were bred here at Purdin Koi Farm, unfortunately though they are the set I can write least about as I don’t have too many archival pictures to hand.

The 2 male Koi, bottom most in the picture, are actually second generation Purdin Koi Farm Sanke.  They came from a female Sanke known as ‘The Bekko’, a Koi which was bred at Purdin Koi Farm from a Matsunosuke bloodline imported Sanke.  There in lays an interesting story.  ‘The Bekko’ was in fact sold as a young ‘male’ Koi to a hobbyist.  When it transpired that he was in fact a she the customer no longer wanted the Koi and it was gratefully taken back by Scott who recognised it’s potential as a parent Koi.  The Maruten Sanke in the middle is a Koi which I’d walked past and fed on many many occasions without really giving it a second glance.  The same goes for all the males in their ponds really I guess.  They are here to perform a function, and other than checking their well being they don’t really get much time spent looking at them until it comes to breeding season.  When we picked that Koi up a couple of weeks ago I was truly gobsmacked.  The quality of the skin, shiroji and beni was truly superb, it glowed in the bowl.  I must learn more about this fish and see when it was identified as a ‘keeper’, it was certainly never for its pattern!

Sanke parent set

Sanke parent set

This was just supposed to be a short ‘these are tonights parents’ post when I started, however the more I started thinking about the specific Koi the more I realised that they are Koi with which I’ve been acquainted since my first visit to the farm in November 2015, and that makes the spawning night even more exciting.


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You can see video of the parents below.


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