The fact that a 21cm Kawarigoi became Grand Champion at the 4th International Junior Koi Show at the weekend continues to be a hot topic here in Niigata – closely followed by talk about the Dainichi Auction which took place yesterday.

31 judges assembled on Saturday morning at 8.30am.  24 of them were Japanese Shinkokai members, i.e. breeders or dealers, 6 were overseas Shinkokai members, 1, the chief judge, was a local government representative for agriculture.

The judges first task was to nominate a Koi from the Kohaku, Sanke, Showa and Shiro Utsuri entries as their personal choice for Grand Champion A.  At the All Japan Koi Show the number of Koi nominated at this stage is generally fairly small, perhaps only 7 or 8 across the 80 or so judges.  When the Koi are smaller at shows such as the International Junior Koi Show (up to 36cm) then the number of individual Koi nominated is usually much higher, indeed the 31 judges nominated more than 10 different Koi for Grand Champion A, many just receiving a singe vote.

The 4 with the highest multiple nominations were moved from their bags into individual and adjacent show pools for the 2nd ballot.  For any Koi to win it would require 16 or more votes to achieve a majority victory.  The image below shows the 4 Koi and the votes they received in this 2nd round of voting.

Grand Champion A 2nd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

Grand Champion A 2nd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

As no Koi achieved that 16 votes the 2 that were clearly the most popular with the judges entered a 3rd round of voting and in the head to head it was the Kohaku that narrowly achieved the victory with a total of 17 votes.

Grand Champion A 3rd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

Grand Champion A 3rd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

This year’s event saw the introduction of Grand Champion B.  In exactly the same way as they had picked Grand Champion A, the judges were now required to select Grand Champion B, a Koi from the other 17 show variety classes. (For more information on the classes see – http://nishikigoi.life/2016/03/07/the-international-junior-koi-show-demystified/)


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On this occasion there were 5 Koi moved forward to take part in a 2nd ballot for Grand Champion B.

When I wrote about benching day on Friday – http://nishikigoi.life/2016/04/22/benching-day-4th-international-junior-koi-show/ – stated ‘Could it be the year of the Goshiki?’.  Unsurprisingly there were 4, including 1 Ginrin Goshiki, among the 5 possible candidates.

When it came down to the voting it was none of the Goshiki that dominated, but a 21bu Beni Kikokuryu, entered into Kawarigoi class, that dominated with 14 votes, just 2 short of the required majority.

Grand Champion B 2nd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

Grand Champion B 2nd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

The Beni Kikokuryu, and the 2 Goshiki which achieved 5 votes each, went through to the next round of voting. Gaining an additional 2 votes the Beni Kikokuryu was crowned Grand Champion B.

Grand Champion B 3rd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

Grand Champion B 3rd Ballot Nominees and Votes Received

In what was the biggest rule change at the show there would now be a final Grand Champion vote, between Grand Champion A and Grand Champion B, a 36bu Kohaku against a 21bu Kawarigoi.

Overall Grand Champion Ballot and Votes Received

Overall Grand Champion Ballot and Votes Received

By just 1 single vote the Beni Kikokuryu was judged to be the winner.


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A shock, a surprise, that was for sure, but that was also why the rule/system was introduced in the first place, to give a bigger presence to non Gosanke.

Was it a worthy winner?  You decide, for sure opinion was split at the Koi show.

 


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