There are not many varieties you can name where one breeder is synonymous as that variety.  Mention Shiro Utsuri and people will think of Omosako, Yamabuki and people think of Izumiya.  Chogoro Koi Farm is in the same category when it come to Purachina, or Platinum Ogon.

As the farm sign below states ‘Platinum Choguro’, although depicts other some more exotic varieties in Heiseinishiki and Ginrin Goshiki Sanke.

Chogoro Koi Farm Sign

Chogoro Koi Farm Sign

Purachina is actually the Japanese word for Platinum, and is written using these katakana characters, プラチナ.  It is what the Japanese call a ‘loan word’, i.e. based on a word from another language.  No doubt the Portugese or Dutch traders brought it several centuries ago, the Portugese and Dutch for platinum being ‘platina’.

Anyway, I digress!

A look into Chogoro san’s Koi house leaves the visitor in now doubt that some special Koi are produced here.  The wall is adorned with winner certificates from the most recent International Junior Koi Shows and Wakagoi Show.

Winner placards at Chogoro Koi Farm

Winner placards at Chogoro Koi Farm

Chogoro Koi Farm is run by Nobuaki Hiroi, an active Facebooker who people may not immediately associate with the farm, save for his profile picture being a Purachina.


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When I stopped by today he was offloading a nisai harvest of varieties other than Purachina, he also produces a small number of Goshiki, Kujaku and Beni Kikokiryu.

Nobuaki Hiroi

Nobuaki Hiroi

As soon as he had finished Nobuaki san didn’t hesitate in picking out a special quality nisai Purachina, even then he was a little critical of it.  People often consider producing single colour varieties as simple, that couldn’t be further from the truth.  Everyone that wants to purchase one wants it to be perfect in every way, producing perfect ones is very difficult.

Nobuaki Hiroi netting nisai Purachina

Nobuaki Hiroi netting nisai Purachina

Below a very bright and very shiny example of Chogoro Koi Farm nisai Purachina.  For years my mother has always wanted to have a ‘perfect white Koi’ just like this.

Nisai Purachina

Nisai Purachina

I the image below we can see a close of the side of the Koi just below the dorsal fin.  We can see the all important fukurin starting to show, more of which later.

Nisai Purachina close up

Nisai Purachina close up

The Koi below is a sansai example bowled up by Hiroi san.  First we had her in a round bowl which she seemed hellbent on jumping out of.  Then we placed her in a rectangular tank and she continued to threaten the same.  As a photographer I always say that if I Koi is going to jump and damage itself I don’t want it to be on my shift.  A single scale out on a Koi like this makes it unsaleable or at least seriously devalued.  When customers arrived and the Koi showed no signs of calming I asked Hiroi san to return it to the pond.

Sansai Purachina

Sansai Purachina

Two close up shots of the Koi above in which we can see the fukurin deepening compared to the nisai above.


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Sansai Purachina close up

Sansai Purachina close up

Sansai Purachina close up

Sansai Purachina close up

I mentioned fukurin above, and someone mentioned it on Facebook yesterday incorrectly.

In the picture below fukurin is outlined roughly by the black line.  It is actually the skin that surrounds the base of the scale.

Fukurin

Fukurin

 


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